All blogs are the views of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Independent Age.

As someone who was born and bred in this great city - in Harrow to be precise which I am now honoured to represent as a local MP - and in my current role of Deputy Shadow Minister, I care passionately about the future of London.

So what type of city can we expect to see in 2030? Will it be able to meet the challenges of an ageing and increasing population? In the next two decades, with a population increasing at a rate of 100,000 per year, it is predicted that we will be living in a city of 10 million people. Even today, before these trends take effect, I receive many letters from Harrow residents on two key areas of concern: housing and our health and social care system.

At the moment we are building only around a third of the new homes that London needs and a credible plan is lacking for the extra 40,000 homes a year that are needed. We need houses that are fit for all generations – from affordable homes for young first time buyers to suitable retirement housing that meets the needs of older people.

In terms of health and social care we are already seeing cuts in services across London as central government funding cuts start to bite. For instance London Councils estimate that the funding gap in adult social care by 2017/18 will be at least £907 million in London; whilst at the same time the number of people aged 65 or over is expected to increase by nearly 50,000 between 2012 and 2017.

Equally the infamous ‘Barnet Graph of Doom’  predicted that by 2030 London councils like Barnet will be unable to provide any services except adult social care and children's services - no libraries, no parks, no leisure centres or even bin collections. If we continue on the present course then the future certainly looks bleak for London’s elderly population. Looking towards a solution our Shadow Health Secretary, Andy Burnham, has led the way by promoting his vision of fully integrating England’s health and social care system: one that it is fully funded and based on the concept of ‘whole person care’.

London cannot wait until 2030 to act on these key challenges, to protect the health and wellbeing of our future citizens – both young and old alike. It is partly for this reason that back in 2010 I called for a Royal Commission to debate the future of London. What is still clear is that decisive action is needed by the next government in 2015. We must have the courage to seize the moment and meet the challenge. Failure to do so will not be forgiven lightly by the generation of 2030.

 

What do you think needs to happen to make the UK the best country to grow older in?

What concerns you most about growing older and why?

Please leave us or the blogger a comment below.

Or send us your responses through our consultation response form.

All blogs are the views of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Independent Age.

As someone who was born and bred in this great city - in Harrow to be precise which I am now honoured to represent as a local MP - and in my current role of Deputy Shadow Minister, I care passionately about the future of London.

So what type of city can we expect to see in 2030? Will it be able to meet the challenges of an ageing and increasing population? In the next two decades, with a population increasing at a rate of 100,000 per year, it is predicted that we will be living in a city of 10 million people. Even today, before these trends take effect, I receive many letters from Harrow residents on two key areas of concern: housing and our health and social care system.

At the moment we are building only around a third of the new homes that London needs and a credible plan is lacking for the extra 40,000 homes a year that are needed. We need houses that are fit for all generations – from affordable homes for young first time buyers to suitable retirement housing that meets the needs of older people.

In terms of health and social care we are already seeing cuts in services across London as central government funding cuts start to bite. For instance London Councils estimate that the funding gap in adult social care by 2017/18 will be at least £907 million in London; whilst at the same time the number of people aged 65 or over is expected to increase by nearly 50,000 between 2012 and 2017.

Equally the infamous ‘Barnet Graph of Doom’  predicted that by 2030 London councils like Barnet will be unable to provide any services except adult social care and children's services - no libraries, no parks, no leisure centres or even bin collections. If we continue on the present course then the future certainly looks bleak for London’s elderly population. Looking towards a solution our Shadow Health Secretary, Andy Burnham, has led the way by promoting his vision of fully integrating England’s health and social care system: one that it is fully funded and based on the concept of ‘whole person care’.

London cannot wait until 2030 to act on these key challenges, to protect the health and wellbeing of our future citizens – both young and old alike. It is partly for this reason that back in 2010 I called for a Royal Commission to debate the future of London. What is still clear is that decisive action is needed by the next government in 2015. We must have the courage to seize the moment and meet the challenge. Failure to do so will not be forgiven lightly by the generation of 2030.

What do you think needs to happen to make the UK the best country to grow older in?

What concerns you most about growing older and why?

Please leave us or the blogger a comment below.

Or send us your responses through our consultation response form.

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